download autodesk inventor lt 2015 trial download office 2007 small business microsoft money for home
nero 11 platinum oem 
buy windows 7 full version professional 
purchase visio 2003 professional 
cheap cialis no prescription buy levitra no prescription kamagra st 100
tadalafil daily price sildenafil pills viagra online prescriptions
sildenafil sydney can you buy viagra over the counter australia buy viagra online australia legal

Wineries Toast to a New Market – Direct Wine Shipping to Massachusetts

Massachusetts Opens for Direct ShipmentsIt’s an exciting weekend in New England. Not only are the Patriots in the Super Bowl, but the first Direct to Consumer wine bottles will begin shipping to Massachusetts on February 1st.

The 2015 Direct to Consumer Report predicts that the expected value of winery shipments to Massachusetts will reach almost $29 million in 2015, $75 million within three years, and over $100 million within a decade. Wineries have an unprecedented opportunity to address an untapped market with a high demand for wine .

Three steps to success:

1) Get Licensed

  • Licenses cost $300 ($150 annual renewal cost) and take around six weeks to process (for more information on the application process, check out this post).
  • Wineries licensed to ship wine will be required to file excise taxes along with Form AB-DS on a monthly or annual basis.
  • Excise taxes will be applied and reported in tiers based on the ABV and type of wine shipped.
  • Sales tax is not required on wine shipments to Massachusetts.
  • Electronic age verification is not required but recommended and available in ShipCompliant through Lexis Nexus and IDology.

2) Find Your Customers

April Damron of winery marketing firm Damron Marketing recommends that wineries carefully prepare their marketing strategy to take full advantage of this new market. She recommends a few simple ways to get started:

  • Gather all available Massachusetts customer information from past winery visits.
  • Update outbound marketing materials and train tasting room staff to highlight Massachusetts as an available shipping state.
  • Begin to promote Massachusetts shipping in all marketing channels — social media, newsletters, emails, website, etc.

3) Start Today

Wineries are thinking differently about marketing to Massachusetts, with some even purchasing TV ad space. Massachusetts has been issuing licenses since the new law came into effect in January. The first shipments for those wineries will begin shipping on Sunday, February 1st.

Don’t wait for the dust to settle at the starting line, get licensed and start making connections with customers in the latest state to open to direct shipping.

If you need help, we’re here to support you. Contact ShipCompliant for guidance.

Report Shows Record-Breaking Year for Direct Wine Shipping

–For Immediate Release–

ShipCompliant and Wines & Vines Release Annual Report Showing Value of Winery Direct Shipments Jumping 15.5% in 2014

(Boulder, COLORADO)—American wineries increased the dollar value of their direct-to-consumer shipments by an unprecedented 15.5% in 2014, with an equally record-breaking increase in the volume of those shipments. The average price per bottle of shipped wine also recovered with a 1.6% increase over 2014, according to the new ShipCompliant/Wines & Vines Wine Shipping Report released today.

The newly released annual report, a collaboration between ShipCompliant and Wines & Vines, can be downloaded at http://www.shipcompliant.com/shippingreport.

The new report on direct-to-consumer shipments held almost exclusively good news, including the fact that in 2014 the volume of shipments increased by 13.6% to 3.95 million cases — or 47.4 million bottles. In addition, the report indicates:

- Oregon wineries increased the value of direct shipments by more than 50%

- Shipments of Pinot Noir increased significantly from 2013.

- The average price of a bottle of wine shipped from wineries rose to $38.40

- Napa Valley continues to lead all other regions with more than $882 million in shipments in 2014.

- The average price of a bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon shipped from Napa Valley was $88.45

- The most expensive categories of wines experienced the largest growth in shipments in 2014.

“The growth we saw in the winery direct-to-consumer channel in 2014 was the best since we began tracking this channel in 2009,” said ShipCompliant VP of Product Jeff Carroll. “There seems very little doubt that direct shipping remains extraordinarily vibrant.”

The ShipCompliant/Wines & Vines annual wine shipping report is based on millions of transactions tracked by ShipCompliant and Wines & Vines’ database of wineries, all of which allows an accurate modeling of the entirety of the winery shipping channel.

About ShipCompliant

ShipCompliant is a SaaS compliance and transaction platform for the beverage alcohol industry. With over 10 years experience, ShipCompliant provides wine, beer and spirits suppliers and importers with a full suite of web-based software tools to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations for direct and wholesale distribution. ShipCompliant works with the industry’s leading software providers and logistics companies to provide fully integrated solutions for direct and three-tier distribution. For more information visit http://www.shipcompliant.com.

About Wines & Vines

Wines & Vines offers a comprehensive collection of products providing news, information and marketing and research capabilities. Its monthly magazine, Wine & Vines, and its Directory/Buyer’s Guide and Online Marketing System provide a wide range of information solutions to the wine and grape industry. For more information visit www.winesandvines.com.

# # #

Contact:

Jeff Carroll
VP Product, ShipCompliant
Jeff (at) ShipCompliant (dot) com
303-996-2343

Are shipping charges taxable in Illinois?

Folks in Illinois are quite litigious when it comes to occupation and use (aka sales) taxes on transportation or delivery (aka “shipping”) charges. Back in 2006, Wal-Mart was hit with a class action for collecting tax on shipping where no tax was allegedly due. In more recent years, over 200 retailers have been sued by a Chicago attorney for not collecting tax on shipping.

So, should you collect and remit tax on shipping charges, or should you not collect or remit taxes on shipping? If only the answer were so black and white. Important considerations, as you will find in the regulations, cases, and articles listed below, are whether the shipping charges are stated separately in your checkout process and on your invoices, whether the shipping charged to the consumer exceed the actual cost of delivery, and whether you provide the customer an option to pick up the wine at the winery.

The goal of this post is not to provide legal advice, as the decision to collect and remit taxes on shipping in Illinois is based on several different factors and your own individual circumstances are important in determining taxability based on those factors. Instead, our aim is to share as much information as we can so that the industry is armed with the facts of the situation and can make informed decisions. We will continue to update this post with documents, resources, and other information that we find. If you come across something that is relevant, please post it in the comments section below or email us at illinois@shipcompliant.com.

Resources:

1) Illinois Regulations: Title 86 Part 130 Section 130.415 Transportation and Delivery Charges

If the seller and the buyer agree upon the transportation or delivery charges separately from the selling price of the tangible personal property which is sold, then the cost of the transportation or delivery service is not a part of the “selling price” of the tangible personal property which is sold, but instead is a service charge, separately contracted for, and need not be included in the figure upon which the seller computes his Retailers’ Occupation Tax liability. Delivery charges are deemed to be agreed upon separately from the selling price of the tangible personal property being sold so long as the seller requires a separate charge for delivery and so long as the charges designated as transportation or delivery or shipping and handling are actually reflective of the costs of such shipping, transportation or delivery

2) Illinois Department of Revenue General Information Letter: ST 13-0025-GIL 05/28/2013 LIQUOR TAX

Under the Liquor Control Act of 1934, out-of-state wineries who are going to sell wine directly to Illinois residents must complete an Application For State Of Illinois Winery Shipper’s License (“Direct Shipping Permit”), which I have enclosed for your convenience. Further, a licensee who is not otherwise required to register under the Retailers’ Occupation Tax Act must register under the Use Tax Act to collect and remit use tax to the Department of Revenue for all gallons of wine that are sold by the licensee and shipped to persons in this State.

3) Illinois Compiled Statutes: 235 ILCS 5/5-1 (from Ch. 43, par. 115)

A winery shipper licensee must pay to the Department of Revenue the State liquor gallonage tax under Section 8-1 for all wine that is sold by the licensee and shipped to a person in this State. For the purposes of Section 8-1, a winery shipper licensee shall be taxed in the same manner as a manufacturer of wine. A licensee who is not otherwise required to register under the Retailers’ Occupation Tax Act must register under the Use Tax Act to collect and remit use tax to the Department of Revenue for all gallons of wine that are sold by the licensee and shipped to persons in this State.

4) Booze Rules Blog: Illinois Qui Tam Lawsuits – Private Enforcement of a State Claim: A Bonanza for Plaintiff’s Lawyer and a Rip-Off of Retailers
5) Brann & Isaacson: Some Good News for Retailers Regarding False Claims Act Issues

6) Illinois Supreme Court: Nancy Kean vs. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

7) Tax Analysts: Illinois Rules Against Chicago “Whistleblower” in False Claims Case

8) Tax Analysts: Qui Tam Troubles, Part 1: An Illinois Informant With No Inside

9) Tax Analysts: Qui Tam Troubles, Part 2: A Relator Seeking to Second-Guess Audits

10) Crain’s Chicago Business: State blows the Whistle on this Whistleblower

11) Cook County Circuit Court: Schad Diamond and Shedden v. National Business Furniture LLC

FedEx will begin shipping wine to Massachusetts on Febuary 1st

FedEx announced today that, effective Feb. 1, 2015, FedEx Express and FedEx Ground will open the state of Massachusetts for legal shipments of alcoholic beverages. The announcement provided the following:

  • FedEx Ground and FedEx Express will both transport legal alcoholic beverage shipments into, out of and within the state of Massachusetts starting Feb. 1, 2015.
  • Please note, unauthorized shipments of alcoholic beverages destined for MA prior to a Feb. 1, 2015 delivery date may not be accepted for delivery and/or returned to shipper.
  • Per FedEx policy, all alcoholic beverage shipments may only be tendered by licensed entities that have executed a FedEx Alcohol Shipping Agreement.
  • All alcoholic beverage shipments must comply with all FedEx policies and federal, state and local regulations.
  • Wine is the only type of alcoholic beverage that is allowed to be shipped to consumers.

FedEx does not provide legal advice to third parties. Questions not related to FedEx policy should be directed to appropriate legal counsel and the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission.

(The new direct-to-consumer statute goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2015. Under the new law a winery must hold a Direct Wine Shipper license that has been approved by the MA ABCC and be registered to pay excise tax in order to ship to MA consumers.)

Massachusetts DTC Applications – How to Get Started

As ShipCompliant reported earlier this week, the new Direct Wine Shipper License application and advisory were released over this past weekend. The new permit law replaces the existing unworkable direct shipping law in its entirety. See the previous post to read more about how the new laws, in effect starting January 1, 2015, apply to wineries.

It is expected to take approximately four weeks for applications to be approved. Wineries may NOT engage in any “sales activities” prior to January 1, 2015. (or their license is approved.) Both the Direct Wine Shipper License application and Direct Wine Shipper License Advisory are available on the Wine Institute, ShipCompliant, and Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission (ABCC) websites. Below please find instructions on how to complete the application process. Questions about the application requirements can be directed to Ralph Sacramone of the ABCC at 617-727-3040 ext. 731 or to Annie Bones at abones@wineinstitute.org.

MASSACHUSETTS NEW DIRECT WINE SHIPPER LICENSE APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS
Step 1: Register with the Department of Revenue to Pay Sales and Excise Taxes

  • Go to MassTax Connect to Register and Pay Excise Taxes (note the date of registration as you will need to enter this on the DTC application.)

Step 2: Application for a Direct Shipper Wine License (effective 1/1/2015)
Part 1 – Applicant Information and Legal Structure

  • Attach vote by the Board of Directors or LLC Managers appointing a manager or principal representative
  • Articles of Organization as filed with the Secretary of State’s Office

Part 2 – Licenses to Manufacture and Export Wine

  • List and attach a copy of your California 02 Winegrower license

Part 3 – Federal Compliance

  • List and attach a copy of your TTB Basic Permit Number
  • List and attach a copy of your FDA Registration

Part 4 – Tax Registration

  • Enter the date that you registered with the MA Department of Revenue to pay sales and excise taxes

Part 5 – Interests in this License

  • All of the limited partners must be listed

Parts 6-8

  • Follow the application’s instructions and provide affidavit(s) if necessary

Part 9 – Previously Held Interests in Other Licenses

  • All of previously held interests must be listed

Part 10 – Transportation and Delivery

  • FedEx Ground should be listed. FedEx Express and UPS are not licensed to deliver DTC wine shipments to MA consumers at this time. The application can be updated by letter if FedEx Express, UPS or any other common carrier enters the market and intend to use their services.

Part 11 – Proof of Age for Sale to Consumers

  • The Code for Direct Shipping Guidelines (http://freethegrapes.org/code-for-direct-shipping) recommends that direct shippers verify the purchaser’s age at the point of online purchase using an approved age verification vendor, such as LexisNexis or IDology.

Part 12 – Proof of Age for Delivery to Consumers
FedEx Ground Control Processes for Alcohol Shipments: FedEx Ground requires Alcohol Shippers to sign a special contract addendum outlining labeling and information requirements

  • Shippers must use FedEx® ShipManager electronic shipping solutions or an approved third-party system
  • Shippers must enter a unique identifier – $AW, in the “Your Reference” field for all wine shipments
  • Shippers must select Adult Signature Service as a condition of delivery of the shipment
  • All wine packages must be labeled with a FedEx approved alcohol label
  • An Adult Signature Service “code” is embedded in the unique bar code tracking ID
  • Delivery scanners alert drivers of the adults signature requirement at point of delivery scan
  • If no eligible recipient is at the address, the scanner prompts driver to apply the proper status code and reattempt delivery at a later time/date
  • FedEx will obtain a signature from any person at least 21 years old (government-issued photo identification required) at the delivery address
  • Part 13

    • Follow the application’s instructions

    Step 3: Direct Wine Shipper License Application Checklist

    • Check payable to ABCC or Commonwealth of MA for $300
    • Transmittal Form
    • Completed Application
    • Articles of Organization as filed with the Secretary of State’s Office
    • Vote by the Board of Directors or LLC Managers appointing a manager or principal representative
    • A copy of your California 02 Winegrower license
    • A copy of your Federal Basic Permit
    • A copy of your FDA Registration

    Send to:
    Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission
    P.O. Box 3396
    Boston, MA 02241-3396

    Annie Bones, State Relations – Wine Institute

    New Direct Wine Shipper License Applications Now Available for Massachusetts


    As we discussed in a previous post, Massachusetts opening to direct shipping is probably the biggest change that we have seen in direct wine shipping since the Granholm Supreme Court decision of 2005. Over the weekend, the Massachusetts ABCC updated their website with a brief advisory on the new direct shipping law that summarizes the law and provides instructions on how to complete the permit process, and how to comply with the reporting requirements.

    Click here to download the Massachusetts direct shipping application (if you are having trouble downloading the application from the Massachusetts website, click here).

    Here’s a quick summary of the new law:

    • Only wineries that hold a TTB license and a license to produce in and export out of their state can qualify for the Direct Wine Shipper License
    • Each licensed direct shippers can ship up to 12 9-liter cases of wine to any one individual per calendar year
    • Direct shipping reports will be due on an annual basis
    • Sales tax is not due for wine products, but is due for any non-wine items such as merchandise
    • Excise taxes will be due on all shipments

    The 7-page application is fairly straightforward, but in addition to some of the usual information (like business and business owner information), you’ll need to answer a couple out-of-the ordinary questions. Note: We’re working to clarify how to answer a few of the questions with the ABCC, and will update this post once we have more information.

    • First, register with Mass Tax Connect to pay excise taxes. You’ll need to include the date you registered on the application.
    • List all businesses (carriers) that will deliver wine on your behalf; carriers must hold a Winery Shipment Transportation Permit

      An early concern over the new Massachusetts wine shipping law was that it did not address the issue of common carriers having to license each and every truck that delivers wine. However, a bill to allow common carriers to obtain a fleet license for the delivery of alcohol is pending in the Massachusetts legislature. It seems somewhat unlikely that the fleet license bill will move this session. But, we believe that at least one of the common carriers will begin to license each of their trucks and therefore will be able to deliver wine to Massachusetts addresses as early as the beginning of February.

    • List your winery’s methods for proof of age for sale and delivery to consumers.

      See our informative post on 7 tips for better age verification, listing the different age verification methods for online wine purchases

    • Include with the application a copy of 1) the license(s) you hold which authorize manufacture and exportation of wine; 2) your TTB Permit; and 3) your FDA Registration
    • Finally, include a check for $300. Make the check out to the “Massachusetts ABCC” and denote the name of the licensee

    We expect Massachusetts will represent an extremely important opportunity for wineries. If is approved, a process that may take as long as four weeks, you can start taking orders as soon as January 1, 2015!

    UPDATE: For a step-by-step guide on filling out the application form, see our following blog post, “Massachusetts DTC Applications – How to Get Started“. Please note: Applicants do NOT have to register to pay sales tax; contradictory towtheyted on the application form, however, applicants MUST apply to pay excise tax at Mass Tax Connect.