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New Mexico Changing Online Tax Filing System

Effective Monday, June 16, 2014, New Mexico went live with their TAP online filing system for Combined Reporting System (CRS) returns. Taxpayers who file the CRS return, regardless of if they currently file paper or electronically, will need to take action to create an account with the new system if they wish to file online. Filers that currently file this return online using the old NM E-Filing Services system please note: your current login and account set up in the older system will not transfer over to the new TAP system; you must register for a new account.

What you need to know about this changeover:

  • If you file by paper for the CRS Return:
    • No action is required, you can continue to file by paper. If you’d like to begin filing online, follow the steps outlined below to get set up with an account. Some tax accounts are required to file online; review this Tax Professionals page for more information.
  • If you efile your CRS Return and have not yet filed for the current reporting period:
    • You must create a TAP account and file this return before July 25, 2014; you will not be able to file using the old system.

To register for a New Mexico TAP account:

  • Go to the New Mexico TAP Website and “Sign Up”
  • Follow the prompts requested by the site; make sure you have:
    • A valid email address. Each TAP profile requires a unique email address.
    • A valid federal ID number such as a Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN) or Social Security Number (SSN)
    • Letter ID from correspondence mailed to you within the last 90 days; or Information pertaining to the business account you wish to sign up for

Questions? Comments? We’d love to hear from you! We are always available at Support@ShipCompliant.com or you can call us during the week at (303) 996-2356.

Product Registrations Online: Out with the Old, In with the New

In the increasingly fast pace of wine, malt and spirit law and compliance, more and more states are recognizing the importance of doing more with less, optimizing processes, and going green. Over the last two years alone, seven states have begun using PRO (Product Registration Online) to accept online label registrations from licensees. For labels registered through PRO in these states, we’ve seen registration time-to-approval drop from weeks or even months to days, and in some cases just a matter of hours! It’s not surprising that states and licensees alike are swapping out traditional registration forms sent via snail mail for electronic registrations transmitted instantaneously and approved in short order.

Since it’s beginning in 2012, PRO has improved the registration process by making label registration move quickly and easily for licensees and state administrators alike. We’ve worked with licensees – covering over 4,000 wholesale brands – to learn what we can do to make registrations less frustrating and time consuming. We also learned about what users can do to make registrations accurate 100% of the time to ensure minimal delays or rejections.

How can I get started?

Need to register labels in Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, New Mexico, South Dakota, or Washington?  Getting started is easy. ShipCompliant users have PRO already integrated into their accounts, and are utilizing end to end workflows including TTB COLA submission and state subsequently automated registrations to multiple states. Outside of a ShipCompliant account, PRO is available by visiting www.productregistrationonline.com.

Where will I be able to register electronically next?

Well, we can’t spill the beans on this yet, but we’re working with quite a few states that have gotten feedback from you, raving about PRO in the existing states. We’re looking to have a new PRO state (or two) in the next couple months. (Hint) one sported a boxing legend and the other produced two brothers with one of America’s finest inventions.  Okay, maybe you can guess the states… In the world of compliance, who needs more time-consuming and tedious forms to fill? Questions? Have a state you’d like to see adopt PRO? Contact us.

Don’t Fall Behind With Your Fortified Wine

Maine, New Mexico, and Washington are the only states that have separate excise tax rates for wine and wine fortified with spirits (Edit: Some states consider a product to be fortified if it is over a certain ABV, regardless of the addition of spirits). To date, we’ve accommodated wineries that shipped fortified products to consumers by having two separate versions of the report or used calculations based on product ABV in each state. Based on user feedback, we wanted to make this process easier and more accurate, so we recently added the ability to specify that a product is fortified in ShipCompliant. With this change, we updated the Maine, New Mexico, and Washington returns listed below so that any orders containing “fortified” products will be taxed at the corresponding rate, beginning with returns that are due on or after March 20.

  • Maine Direct Shipper Excise Tax and Premium Report of Table Wine, Sparkling and Fortified Wine
  • New Mexico Liquor Excise Tax Return for Direct Shippers
  • Washington LIQ-318 Wine Authorized Representative Certificate of Approval Holder Summary Tax Report
  • Washington Liquor Shipment and Tax Report (LIQ-778 Distributor)
  • Washington Liquor Shipment and Tax Report (LIQ-870 Wine Shipper)

If you are subscribed to one of the returns listed above, we will automatically update your return to tax products based on the new “fortified” product settings starting Friday, February 28 – you do not have to take any action in your ShipCompliant account unless you have fortified products.

To mark products as fortified, select the “Fortified” checkbox when adding or editing products in your account. Please note: Any orders entered prior to specifying that a product is fortified will not be retroactively updated. To learn more, read our client Knowledge Base article.

Is the Marketplace Fairness Act Fair for Wineries?


In short, yes, for a couple of reasons:

1. Wineries already pay sales tax in most states
2. The vast majority of wineries will likely be exempt from the law

So what is it, exactly?

Senate Bill S. 743, more commonly known as the “Marketplace Fairness Act“, is a pretty simple bill that would give states the ability to require out of state businesses that have “remote sales” in excess of $1 million annually to remit sales taxes. Each state would be able to opt in to the Act, but only after they have simplified their tax structure, either by joining the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement or to follow the steps outlined in the bill to simplify their sales tax requirements.

Will it pass?

With broad bi-partisan support, S. 743 passed out of the Senate with a vote of 69 to 27. However, a tough battle is expected in the House, and therefore the Marketplace Fairness Act has a long way to go before it is enacted with a signature from President Obama. Amazon.com is supporting the bill (presumably because they would like to move forward with their plans to build warehouses in each state to support same-day shipping), while eBay is one of the main voices in opposition.

What will it mean for wineries?

A lot hinges on the definition of “remote sales”. Keep in mind the fact that state legislation to allow wine shipments typically includes a provision that also requires wineries to register for and pay sales tax. As it stands in the Senate version, and based on our interpretation of the current language, sales by wineries to states where they are already required to pay sales tax would not be counted when considering the $1 million threshold for remote sales.

Based on some quick analysis, there are a few hundred wineries in the US that ship more than $1 million worth of wine to consumers each year. BUT, if you include sales only to those states (Alaska, Colorado, D.C., Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Wyoming) that do not require wineries to pay sales tax, then we estimate that less than 25 wineries would exceed the $1 million cap. In other words, the vast majority of the 7,000+ wineries in the US would be exempt from this law.

Wineries are already accustomed to calculating, collecting, and remitting sales taxes in most states. So, for those wineries that would not be exempt from this law, it would probably not be that big of a deal to add a few more states (initially the states of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, and Wyoming) to the list of states to which they would be required to remit sales tax. They already have the technology and processes to do so.

The bill would take effect, at the earliest, on October 1st, 2013. Once effective, the 22 “Streamlined” sales tax states would begin requiring sales tax for remote sellers with over $1 million in sales. After that, each of the remaining 28 states would choose whether to opt in to the Act and start requiring sales tax from remote sellers.

Wine Retailers Can Only Ship to 14 States

Map of the Retailer Direct Shipping States

Since the 2005 Granholm v. Heald Supreme Court decision addressing the interstate direct shipment of wine, the number of states allowing out-of-state wineries to ship directly to consumers has increased from 31 states to 40. The experience for licensed wine retailers (for example: brick and mortar wine shops, California Type 85 or 20 licensees and auction houses) however, has been somewhat different. The number of states previously available to retailers since 2005 has declined from 18 to 14 states and the District of Columbia.

What Retailers Need to Know

To help retailers navigate the market, we’ve created a quick reference guide, including basic information on regulations in the states available for retailer-to-consumer wine shipping. This guide includes links to license applications, statutes, state websites, and volume limits (if applicable). Note that four states on this list are “reciprocal” states. Reciprocity means generally that if state X’s retailers are allowed to ship into state Y, then state Y’s retailers may ship into state X without the need to obtain a direct shipper license or permit in the destination state. These states are: Idaho, Missouri, New Mexico, and California. General requirements that apply to interstate retail shipments also include but are not limited to:


Download the Retailer Wine Shipping Guide

All states available to retailers are also available to wineries, and in many cases the regulations for the two shippers are similar. Indeed, permit-required states like North Dakota and New Hampshire allow for retailers and wineries to use the same application process and abide by the same rules in order to direct ship wine to that state. With this observation in mind, it would stand to reason that there is the potential for retailers to be welcomed to the same direct shipping states as wineries; actual practice, however, gives wineries access to three times the amount of the US market share.

Additional resources:









Wine Sales and Distribution 2012 – A Look Forward

In looking forward to what 2012 might bring the world of wine compliance and regulation, it is instructive to first look back at 2011. One thing we’ve learned after eight years in the world of wine compliance is that once movements gain momentum, it’s hard to slow them down.

The past year demonstrated the continuation of certain trends and the emergence of another that we believe will carry forward in 2012. The trend of more states opening their borders to the direct shipment of wine from other states continued steadily. Maryland and New Mexico both opened their borders to permit-based direct-to-consumer shipping in 2011, a continuation of a movement toward regulated consumer access to wine that began in 2005 with the Granholm v. Heald Supreme Court decision. Tennessee also saw a change in their law in 2011 that made the entire state “wet” for direct shipments from wineries.

The past 12 months also saw an increase in new “Third Party Providers” that help wineries market their products to a broader collection of consumers. Either as flash sites, wine product advertisements, or multi-offer marketplaces, these new entries into the wine market were helped along by a new California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Advisory that set down specific rules as to how suppliers and non-licensed Third Party Providers can work together compliantly.

Finally, 2011 demonstrated that various forms of privatization of the sale and distribution of wine and spirits in control states are an important trend to watch. The passage of Initiative 1183 in Washington State that took the sale and distribution of spirits out of the hands of the Washington Liquor Control Board was the most tangible example of the privatization trend.


What To Expect in 2012

Direct-To-Consumer Shipping
Winery-to-Consumer shipping laws will continue to be modernized in those now few states that continue to prohibit interstate shipping. We expect New Jersey, the most important wine consuming state currently outlawing interstate shipments, to pass legislation allowing some form of direct shipments to consumers. Currently, a bill working its way through the legislature would allow all wineries making up to 250,000 gallons annually to obtain a direct shipment permit. The capacity cap of 250,000 gallons will be a point of concern, but wineries should expect passage and should be prepared to ship to New Jersy consumers in 212. The bill, which has passed the senate, is expected to be voted on in the assembly before the close of session tomorrow, January 10th.

Massachusetts too has seen a number of direct shipment bills introduced over the past couple of years, but none have found their way to the Governor’s desk. Recently, however, Governor Deval Patrick put a spotlight back on the issue by saying in a radio interview that he would sign legislation that permitted direct-to-consumer wine shipments. 2012 may be the year that Massachusetts finally opens to direct-to-consumer shipping.

Finally, Pennsylvania, traditionally one of the states where alcohol sales and distribution is most tightly controlled, may see a move to allow direct-to-consumer shipping. As talk continues in that state to privatize wine sale and distribution, there has also been much talk and the introduction of bills to “modernize” the PLCB, including allowing direct-to-consumer shipping, opening up a state with big consumer potential for wineries.

Modernized Marketing
Digital marketing in the wine industry has been behind the curve due primarily to the massive amount of regulations that govern the industry on a federal and state level. It’s unlikely that the wine industry will see significant deregulation. However, it appears that some clarity is coming to the issues that have historically deterred modern marketing methods.

Late in 2011 the California ABC issued an “Advisory” that spelled out the conditions under which non-licensed Third Party Providers (TPPs) and suppliers must arrange their relationships in order to work together. In a nutshell, the California ABC made clear that wineries and other licensed suppliers must always be in control of the transaction from approving each transaction to controlling the flow of funds. (Read our blog post that explains these new rules). While adhering to the new California ABC rules can be a complex task and require very specific actions and programming on the part of licensed suppliers and non-licensed TPPs such as flash sites and community buying sites, we believe this new clarity represents an important development for suppliers and marketers that will yield interesting developments in 2012

We expect to see a rise in the number of TPPs. In addition, we expect other states to follow California’s lead in issuing rules and regulations for how licensees and non-licensed marketers can work together to help market wine to consumers in innovative ways.

Privatization
With Washington State paving the way in the realm of privatization of sales and distribution with the passage of Initiative 1183 in November, we predict the privatization trend to regain momentum in 2012. Most eyes are on Pennsylvania where serious discussions are underway concerning the privatization of the sale and distribution of wine in that highly controlled state. Virginia too has seen discussions in the past years concerning the merits of reforming its alcohol control system. Meanwhile, in Michigan a task force has been empowered to look at updating its alcohol beverage laws.

This slow moving trend toward privatization, if it continues and gains more momentum, could lead to significant changes in the area of wine sales and distribution and the compliance measures that suppliers must undertake.

Federal Action on Wine Sales and Distribution
In early 2011, with the introduction of H.R. 1161 (read our series on the CARE Act here) in the House of Representatives, it looked like supporters of federal legislation that would give states greater control over how they can regulate alcohol and overcome judicial rulings that have put limits on state powers, would push hard to see this bill passed. Yet, H.R. 1161 garnered fewer supporters in the House than a similar bill, H.R. 5034, gained in 2010. Furthermore, no hearing was held in the House Judiciary Committee on H.R. 1161 and no Senate sponsor was introduced.

This bill, opposed by all supplier organizations and by retailers, has another year to gain more support and move through the legislative process. Most in the industry are taking a wait and see attitude on H.R. 1161 to determine its fate, but it seems unlikely that the bill will move on to President Obama’s desk in 2012.

Finally, federal legislation is moving forward concerning the United States Postal Services, and it could have long-term effects on the wine industry. The new bill moving forward is the 21st Century Postal Service Act 2011. If enacted as currently written it would allow the United States Postal Service to deliver wine to consumers and compete with Federal Express and United Parcel Service.

As always, ShipCompliant will continue to watch the political and regulatory landscape throughout the coming year and will work to keep you up-to-date on important changes that impact your ability to market and sell wine.